Black Angry Women

Ask Yourself: Why Aren't You Angry?


Leave a comment

Black Handshake – 26 November 2016

The moment we are born, we begin to die.  BlackParentSpeaks overstands the truth of that statement.

I was young once upon a time and intimately and boldly entrenched in the Black ‘Movement’ for justice and freedom.  I fought the good fight and I fought it hard and long…. Fear did not change my involvement or commitment to righteousness.  ‘White’ laws meant little — if anything — in comparison to right and wrong/justice and injustice.  Unselfish service and sacrificial loyalty helped in guiding my actions and thoughts.  BlackParentSpeaks assertively lived a purpose-filled ‘Black’ life. Today, in the twilight of my years, BlackParentSpeaks continues to live a life firmly embedded in ‘Black’ righteousness and justice — Don’t forget our reparations!

God blessed me in more ways than I can ever fully enumerate.  Amongst my first blessings was being born ‘Black’. My parents did not smoke, drink alcohol, or cuss.  They were faithful to each other and they had a good marriage; I can only remember them arguing on one occasion as information.  During my childhood years, my father was my go-to person.  My ‘Black’ father – Daddy – was always encouraging and supportive no matter what I did or did not do.

I was always a serious child — full of energy and curiosity. As a c.3-year old, I sometimes ventured out on my own, got lost — but I never felt fear or uneasiness. Usually, the Portland (Oregon) Police would find me and an officer would lift me up, sit me on his motorcycle or in his car, and take me to the patrol house. I became quite familiar with the Police — even as a young child. My boldness was something to behold and the Portland Police treated me with the respect and admiration my personna demanded.

I liked going to the Police precinct for a number of reasons. The officers called me ‘Little Lulu’ and I enjoyed conversing with them just as I enjoyed conversing with other adults. Because I enjoyed singing, I often belted out songs while wandering the streets of Portland. And, when the Police did find me, I oft-times offered to sing them my ‘signature song (Search Me Lord)’ — but only if they got me a chocolate ice cream cone. Needless to say, the Police always obliged my request although on one occasion an officer made a mistake and brought me a vanilla ice cream cone which I immediately rejected. The officer who made the ‘mistake’ was quickly admonished by the other officers and told to go out and get ‘Little Lulu’ a chocolate ice cream cone as she requested…. On each occasion, I only sang AFTER I had received and eaten my chocolate ice cream cone — smile.

My father never fretted over the person that I was. In fact, he encouraged me to be me. Daddy’s only caveat was that I realize and consider the possible consequences of my actions and inactions. Daddy also told me that it is better to do something than to go away and later wish that you had done something…. And, Daddy schooled me on the difference between ‘Black’ thought and ‘White’ thought as well as the difference between ‘White’ folk and ‘Black’ folk.

I grew up working in my father’s multiple businesses. Daddy’s businesses included accounting, moving and storage, sales, painting and wallpapering, etc. Daddy was an electrician, a plumber, an inventor, a printer, a writer, an unbelievably fast typist, a scientist, a runner, a golfer, a coach and referee, an educator and tutor, a pianist, and MORE. On top of everything else, Daddy was an exceedingly good cook — although he dirtied way too many dishes when he cooked meals at home. It seemed like there was nothing that my father could not do.

Daddy lived an ‘undying love for Black people’ life. He valued loyalty and overstood what ‘truth’ really meant.

My father’s parenting skills were phenomenal.  It seems that he always took great delight in his 13 children and he believed in the power of explanatory words and patience.  The chatter of young voices and the patter of children’s feet along with the laughter and seriousness were welcomed by Daddy.

Daddy was a man of immense overstanding and knowledge.  He listened and he engaged me and my siblings and others in countless activities and pursuits.  Early-on, Daddy saw my ‘Blackness’ and he guided and schooled me accordingly.

My father expressed particular beliefs and values that continue to resonate with me to this day.  Example:  A man should never hit a woman.  ‘If a woman holding a baseball bat comes at a man, it is far better for that man to try to run away than for that man to put his hands on the woman.’  Example:  Man is human.  ‘Never put any human being on a pedestal.’  Example:  Do not get ‘caught-up’ in the accolades nor the criticisms.

Being an adventurous and curious young child, I sometimes  asked Daddy when I would be old enough to finally leave home and personally explore the world.  Daddy’s response:  ‘YOU will know when you are ready to REALLY leave home and your father will know as well….’  Life, for me, was serious and I listened with my eyes, ears, and heart.

‘Little Lulu’ appreciated and valued the experiences and stories shared by her elders and others.  I heard the older Blacks as they spoke of racism — slavery, drag racing, and more.  I listened and I felt and I contemplated.

By the time I reached the age of 16, I knew I was truly ‘ready’ to leave home — as did my father.  I took the train and traveled alone from Portland, Oregon to California.  From California, I traveled with others — via car — to Michigan.  Although I considered remaining in Michigan, I chose to return home a few weeks later in order to complete my high school years in Portland.

While still in high school, I received an unexpected and unsolicited job offer from US Attorney General Robert Kennedy.  My moving expenses and more would be covered if I accepted Kennedy’s offer.  Needless to say, I was excited and sorely tempted, however, Daddy convinced me to turn Kennedy down.  Interestingly, years later I received an offer to work for Robert Kennedy’s brother — Senator Edward Kennedy.  I turned down that offer as well….

Don’t forget our reparations!  Do YOU know what time it is?

Feel free to share this BlackAngryWomen blog with others.  We are all works in progress.

Undying love for Black People

http://BlackAngryWomen.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Black Is Not White…. 2 November 2016

After yet another very emotional bout with racism and disgust, BlackParentSpeaks feels a need to write and share. My journey is real and it seems that my purpose has always been.

In order to both survive and ‘live’, Black folk must begin to internalize truth. Fact one: White folk do not like Black folk. Fact two: White folk will continue to rationalize their racist words and behaviors as long as they believe they are able to skirt responsibility and blame. And, Fact three: There are significant and obvious differences between White people and Black people.

Essential to ‘Black’ survival is the knowledge that each and every Black life has been impacted as a result of slavery and racism.  Words can never adequately express Black people’s suffering at the hands of White folk.  Both White men and White women are guilty and both should be consciously and actively seeking forgiveness while donating to BlackAngryWomen and/or other entities of racial truth and assistance.

The ‘White’ mindset portends and espouses that we are all one people — Black folk and White folk. The truth is that we are different and a truly ‘Black’ mind is NOT in sync with the ‘White’ mind.  Not only is there difference in our thoughts, there is a difference in how we think.  Our motivations differ and our ‘Black’ values and morals conflict significantly with ‘White’ norms, ‘White’ judgments, and ‘White’ readings.

In ‘Black’ life, it is not okay to address Black men and Black women as ‘boys and girls’.  In ‘Black’ life, it is not respectful for young folk to address elders by their first names without the Black elders extending invitations to be called by their first names.  ‘Black’ life speaks to overstanding and has an ‘undying love for Black people’ foundation.  ‘Black’ life learns from our ancestors and listens to our elders.  ‘Black’ life does not look for — nor does it seek — the acceptance or approval of others’.  ‘Black’ life is about nation building and unity.

I am always aware and conscious of my ‘Blackness’.  I embrace myself with love and appreciation.  I like who I am and I am truly grateful for my journey.  I have seen the beauty of ‘Black’ commitment and loyalty in folk like me.  I have witnessed the strength of Black people and shared in the joys of victory while overstanding sadness and loneliness as fellow warriors ‘gave up the ghost’….

Brother Stokely ‘Black Power’ Carmichael (lka Kwame Ture), Rev. David H. Eaton, Brother Marion Barry, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Brother Ralph Featherstone, Brother Halim Rahsaan, Sister Eleanor Matthews, and so many many more.

Food for ‘Black’ thought:

(a) If you want to die, go to a hospital.

(b) It is often wiser to be proactive as opposed to reactive.  However, it is sometimes better to do and/or say something than to go away and wish later that you had done or said something.

(c)  Click the Donate button at the top right of BlackAngryWomen and donate now if you are so inclined.  Remember to forward BlackAngryWomen posts to others. 

(d)  It is NOT okay for adults to whip or beat children.  Adults should be creative, loving, and patient when motivating and interacting with children.  An adult should never  verbally or physically abuse a child.

(e)  Pick an opportune moment this week and turn off and put out-of-sight your phone for a minimum of 5 to 7 hours.  If you are able to do this, you may experience a true sense of relief and accomplishment afterwards.

‘Don’t forget our reparations’.

Feel free to share this BlackAngryWomen blog with others. We are all works in progress. Do YOU know what time it is? http://BlackAngryWomen.com/

Undying love for Black people!

http://BlackAngryWomen.com/


Leave a comment

Racism Today in Portland, Oregon – MEALS ON WHEELS….

27 September 2016
TO:
Renata Wilson
Chief Operations Officer
Meals on Wheels People
Phone: 503.953.8135
Cell: 503.970.6949 renata.wilson@mealsonwheelspeople.org web | facebook | twitter

My dear Ms. Renata Wilson:

It is important to point out that the vast majority of people who are subjected to racist and/or racial mistreatment, illegal discrimination, and actionable-wrongs, etc. never file complaints for a myriad of reasons. Ms.Wilson, I do not know if you have authority with regards to MS. COLETTE LIVERMORE because MS. COLETTE LIVERMORE, Cherry Blossom MEALS ON WHEELS Center Manager here in Portland, Oregon adamantly and in-my-face ‘initially’ declared to me that no one is over her and that she does not answer to anyone — not a board or otherwise.

Ms. Wilson, I received your phone message and called Executive Officer Ms. Washington and left a message on her phone expressing that if additional information was sought, to let me know. I have not received a return call and, therefore, believe my initial public EMail adequately stated my racist and ugly experience with ‘White’ MS. COLETTE LIVERMORE, Cherry Blossom MEALS ON WHEELS Center Manager located at 740 SE 106th Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97216.

Ms. Wilson, I pray appropriate and effective action is taken with regards to ‘White’ MS. COLETTE LIVERMORE, Cherry Blossom MEALS ON WHEELS Center Manager located at 740 SE 106th Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97216 following your “investigation” and your return to your office next week. Further, I strongly suggest that Nondiscriminatory procedures and guidelines be enacted with respect to MEALS ON WHEELS and that ‘complaint’ forms be drawn up and available.

My common sense tells me that illegal discrimination should not be tolerated, allowed, or encouraged with respect to MEALS ON WHEELS or its employees or representatives. Statements like ‘you people are so sensitive’ and ‘I have had enough of you people today’, etc. should not come forth from the lips of your employees or representatives while ‘serving on the job’. Courtesy and respect should be expected hallmarks for ALL. I — a Black senior citizen — should be greeted by Cherry Blossom MEALS ON WHEELS with a welcome vibe. Tellingly, my ‘Black’ experience has been otherwise.

Ms. Wilson, I thank you for at least reading this.

Lulu R. Johnson; ‘A Black Parent Speaks’; 4016 SE 174th Avenue, Apt. 3; Portland, OR 97236. Phone: 971-222-9750. Go to: https://blackangrywomen.com/ E-Mail: BlackParentSpeaks@juno.com
———- Original Message ———-

From: “Wilson, Renata”
To: “blackparentspeaks@juno.com”
Subject: Your Email from September 21, 2016
Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 22:43:56 +0000

Hello Ms. Johnson,

thank you for your email regarding your experience at our Cherry Blossom Center yesterday. Please be assured that we are investigating the situation and will get back to you soon. We appreciate your patience as we look into the matter.

I am truly sorry about your negative experience.

Sincerely,
Renata Wilson
Chief Operations Officer
Meals on Wheels People
Phone: 503.953.8135
Cell: 503.970.6949 renata.wilson@mealsonwheelspeople.org web | facebook | twitter

====================

To:oaba-b@maillist.peak.org, colette.livermore@mealsonwheelspeople.org
Cc:attorneymiller99@aol.com, berrycardis@yahoo.com, sen.chipshields@state.or.us
Sent: Thu, Sep 22, 2016 09:55 AM
Be Informed! Be Aware! Be Involved!
‘A Black Parent Speaks’; 4016 SE 174th Avenue, Apt. 3; Portland, OR 97236. Phone: 971-222-9750. Go to: https://blackangrywomen.com/ E-Mail: BlackParentSpeaks@juno.com
====

Racist ugliness experienced at CHERRY BLOSSOM CENTER located at 740 SE 106th Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97216 yesterday by Cherry Blossom Center Manager, Meals on Wheels COLETTE LIVERMORE.

I am Lulu Johnson, a ‘Black’ low income senior citizen as information. Yesterday, 21 September 2016, I arrived at CHERRY BLOSSOM CENTER c.11 AM hoping and expecting to pick up the FREE produce offered there WITHOUT PROBLEM. I had another Black lady — disabled — with me. We were immediately accosted by a COLETTE LIVERMORE and soon I was told that I needed to prove and demonstrate English proficiency to Ms. COLETTE LIVERMORE’s satisfaction in order to get the FREE produce. COLETTE LIVERMORE, Cherry Blossom Center Manager – Meals on Wheels, was racist, rude, and arrogant, and UGLY in her approach. She refused the Black lady with me the produce and that lady returned to my car rather than become embroiled in an ugly encounter. I, however, REFUSED to comply with ‘White’ COLETTE LIVERMORE’s demands and I insisted on receiving at least some of the FREE produce.

While involved in having words with ‘White’ COLETTE LIVERMORE, a ‘White’ man approached and asked for the FREE produce. He was given the FREE produce WITHOUT any problems or requests of him…. I asked ‘White’ COLETTE LIVERMORE for a complaint form and was told by her that none exists because she is the final word on all. I asked to speak to her supervisor, etc. and she explained that she has NO one over her — no board, etc. ‘White’ COLETTE LIVERMORE said the FREE produce program is hers and that she decides how to run it and she changes the rules as she chooses and whenever she so chooses. She told me that if I wanted to complain about her, I could write my complaint down and hand it to her and she would evaluate it…. As information, I did NOT comply with ‘White’ COLETTE LIVERMORE’s demand that I demonstrate English proficiency to her satisfaction!

I hope that any and all who read this review express their outrage — or appreciation — by calling ‘White’ COLETTE LIVERMORE, Cherry Blossom Center Manager – Meals on Wheels, at 503-953-8104. Cell number is 503-256-2381. Address is: 740 SE 106th Avenue; Portland, Oregon 97216. EMail: colette.livermore@mealsonwheelspeople.org
____________________________________________________________

Lulu R. Johnson; ‘A Black Parent Speaks’; 4016 SE 174th Avenue, Apt. 3; Portland, OR 97236. Phone: 971-222-9750. Go to: https://blackangrywomen.com/ E-Mail: BlackParentSpeaks@juno.com


Leave a comment

A Black Woman’s Strength

Looking back at the 1960s – 1970s Black ‘Movement’ from my most-intimate and involved vantage point, I am now comfortable in stating that there were sacrifices – great sacrifices.

My Oregon parents and their neighbors were questioned regarding me.  There were threats from America’s law enforcement community to my livelihood, my life, etc.  I was offered money, a leadership position, and ‘protection’ to sell-out.  My home was entered while I was away.  At least one attempt was made on my life.  I was relentlessly followed.  And, yes, there was more.

It was not uncommon for me to look up from my paid job with the Neighborhood Legal Services Program and see FBI agents coming to take me into custody.  At times, I was placed in handcuffs.  At other times, I was not handcuffed.

I was often escorted from my job, driven away in a car, and questioned at a different location – usually in a downtown DC building.  There were sometimes veiled threats.  At other times, I was told outright that I could or would be harmed if I did not cooperate.  Needless to say, I NEVER knew anything.  Therefore, I was NEVER able to give any information to the FBI or any of the other law enforcement ‘agents’ assigned to follow and monitor me.

I recall one occasion when I was taken away by two FBI agents and interrogated relative to an ‘alleged’ relationship between Muhammad Ali and a ‘Chicken Man’….  Although I responded that I had never personally met Brother Muhammad Ali and I had no idea who ‘Chicken Man’ was, the futile questioning continued.  Finally, after repeated questions, I was told that my life was in danger ‘because of my refusal to cooperate’ with law enforcement.

My position in the ‘Movement’ commanded a keen sense of awareness.  I was trusted with ‘sensitive’ information.   At times, I had to make split-second decisions.  I can truthfully say that never did I waver nor have I ever regretted any of the decisions I made with respect to the ‘Movement’.

Encouragement – for me – came from a c.93+ year old Black woman who mailed us (Stokely ‘Black Power’ Carmichael and me) a note with two dollars to help in the ‘Movement’.  Her note expressed her gratitude and faith in us to keep up the struggle.  She wrote that she could ‘die in peace’ knowing that we were continuing the fight for our Black people….  Letters and sentiments like that brought heaviness to my heart and tears to my eyes.  Our elder sister’s words-on-paper reinforced my commitment to righteousness.  Indeed, I was privileged and ‘chosen’ by a power beyond man….

Because our lives were intertwined with the ‘Movement’, caution and awareness were employed.  I became an intimate confidant of Stokely’s and Martin’s (Martin Luther King) and David’s (Rev. David Eaton) and others’.

I recall being driven around DC by the son of the Ambassador from Pakistan.  I recall dinners in New York and at the home of Tanzanian Ambassador Gosbert Rutabanzibwa.  I recall dancing with Charles Diggs.  I recall contemplating a move to Cuba and changing my mind.  I recall reading Chairman Mao’s ‘Little Red Book’ and the passage regarding men and oral sex.

I recall being ‘almost’ raped by a well-known ‘Black’ man (deemed a “leader” by the White media) who I fought and struggled with to the point of sweat-ridden exhaustion.  The man finally stopped his vicious assault on my person only after I managed to say that if he stuck his ‘thing’ in my vagina, I would tell the ‘world’….

Feel free to share this BlackAngryWomen blog with others.  We are all works in progress.  Do YOU know what time it is?  http://BlackAngryWomen.com/

 

http://BlackAngryWomen.com/