Black Angry Women

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Black & White Oregon and Plagues in America

Race confusion runs amok in America as the disconnect between individuals expands even within easily identified racial and ethnic groups.

BlackParentSpeaks has never been an advocate of segregation or integration as defined and designed by White folk.  BlackParentSpeaks does — and always has — supported ‘Black Power’.

Life was so much simpler when BlackParentSpeaks was a youngster.  Folk were either Black or White.  In other words, if a person was NOT ‘accepted’ as White by ‘White America’, that person was ‘considered’ and identified as Black or a ‘person of color’.

Clearly, I recall some of the multiple discomforts of public school integration here in Portland, Oregon during the 1950s.  Prior to that time, my childhood world was both loving and racially embracing and ‘Black’ schools were inviting and nurturing and educationally fun.

As a third-grader, BlackParentSpeaks was legally forced to ‘integrate’ to a ‘White’ school — namely, Irvington Elementary School in Portland, Oregon.  Although the ‘change’ was without question traumatic for me as a child, it exposed BlackParentSpeaks to up-close and in-my-face racism.  I was hurled into the ‘belly of the beast’ — White racism.

Today, having been both a victim and a survivor of racism — America’s White racism, has ‘helped’ in qualifying BlackParentSpeaks as a ‘truthful’ expert on White folk and racism.

Racism is the greatest impediment to ‘true’ Black success.  And, racism is the greatest impediment to White salvation.  No matter the color or ethnicity of a person, money and material hoarding and possessions do not equate to success nor does such equate to a person’s salvation.

Racism, poverty, homelessness and sub-par housing issues, hunger, health issues and health problems, school and library failures, unemployment and underemployment, gouging and usury, disconnects, selfishness and greed and the ‘rich get richer’ allowances, disrespect and a wanton lack of self-respect,  arrogance and a ‘me and mine’ mindset, are some of the many ‘domestic’ plagues facing local jurisdictions and  this nation.

All questions have answers and all problems have solutions.

Remember Food for ‘Black’ thought:

(a) If you want to die, go to a hospital.

(b) It is often wiser to be proactive as opposed to reactive.  However, it is sometimes better to do and/or say something than to go away and wish later that you had done or said something.

(c)  Click the Donate button at the top right of BlackAngryWomen and donate now if you are so inclined.  Remember to forward BlackAngryWomen posts to others. 

(d)  It is NOT okay for adults to whip or beat children.  Adults should be creative, loving, and patient when motivating and interacting with children.  An adult should never  verbally or physically abuse a child.

(e)  Pick an opportune moment this week and turn off and put out-of-sight your phone for a minimum of 5 to 7 hours.  If you are able to do this, you may experience a true sense of relief and accomplishment afterwards.

‘Don’t forget our reparations’.

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Undying love for Black people!

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Black Fidel Castro

Cuba’s Fidel Castro ‘gave up the ghost’ c.yesterday at the age of 90.

With due respect, BlackParentSpeaks pays tribute to Cuba’s Fidel Castro — a supporter and friend of the ‘Black Movement’ in the United States.   It was doing the ‘Movement’ days that BlackParentSpeaks  came to know and truly appreciate Fidel Castro.  In fact, had it not been for Brother Lester, BlackParentSpeaks  would have travelled to Cuba at Castro’s invite.

Nuff’ Said.

With Undying love.

Don’t forget our reparations!


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Black Handshake – 26 November 2016

The moment we are born, we begin to die.  BlackParentSpeaks overstands the truth of that statement.

I was young once upon a time and intimately and boldly entrenched in the Black ‘Movement’ for justice and freedom.  I fought the good fight and I fought it hard and long…. Fear did not change my involvement or commitment to righteousness.  ‘White’ laws meant little — if anything — in comparison to right and wrong/justice and injustice.  Unselfish service and sacrificial loyalty helped in guiding my actions and thoughts.  BlackParentSpeaks assertively lived a purpose-filled ‘Black’ life. Today, in the twilight of my years, BlackParentSpeaks continues to live a life firmly embedded in ‘Black’ righteousness and justice — Don’t forget our reparations!

God blessed me in more ways than I can ever fully enumerate.  Amongst my first blessings was being born ‘Black’. My parents did not smoke, drink alcohol, or cuss.  They were faithful to each other and they had a good marriage; I can only remember them arguing on one occasion as information.  During my childhood years, my father was my go-to person.  My ‘Black’ father – Daddy – was always encouraging and supportive no matter what I did or did not do.

I was always a serious child — full of energy and curiosity. As a c.3-year old, I sometimes ventured out on my own, got lost — but I never felt fear or uneasiness. Usually, the Portland (Oregon) Police would find me and an officer would lift me up, sit me on his motorcycle or in his car, and take me to the patrol house. I became quite familiar with the Police — even as a young child. My boldness was something to behold and the Portland Police treated me with the respect and admiration my personna demanded.

I liked going to the Police precinct for a number of reasons. The officers called me ‘Little Lulu’ and I enjoyed conversing with them just as I enjoyed conversing with other adults. Because I enjoyed singing, I often belted out songs while wandering the streets of Portland. And, when the Police did find me, I oft-times offered to sing them my ‘signature song (Search Me Lord)’ — but only if they got me a chocolate ice cream cone. Needless to say, the Police always obliged my request although on one occasion an officer made a mistake and brought me a vanilla ice cream cone which I immediately rejected. The officer who made the ‘mistake’ was quickly admonished by the other officers and told to go out and get ‘Little Lulu’ a chocolate ice cream cone as she requested…. On each occasion, I only sang AFTER I had received and eaten my chocolate ice cream cone — smile.

My father never fretted over the person that I was. In fact, he encouraged me to be me. Daddy’s only caveat was that I realize and consider the possible consequences of my actions and inactions. Daddy also told me that it is better to do something than to go away and later wish that you had done something…. And, Daddy schooled me on the difference between ‘Black’ thought and ‘White’ thought as well as the difference between ‘White’ folk and ‘Black’ folk.

I grew up working in my father’s multiple businesses. Daddy’s businesses included accounting, moving and storage, sales, painting and wallpapering, etc. Daddy was an electrician, a plumber, an inventor, a printer, a writer, an unbelievably fast typist, a scientist, a runner, a golfer, a coach and referee, an educator and tutor, a pianist, and MORE. On top of everything else, Daddy was an exceedingly good cook — although he dirtied way too many dishes when he cooked meals at home. It seemed like there was nothing that my father could not do.

Daddy lived an ‘undying love for Black people’ life. He valued loyalty and overstood what ‘truth’ really meant.

My father’s parenting skills were phenomenal.  It seems that he always took great delight in his 13 children and he believed in the power of explanatory words and patience.  The chatter of young voices and the patter of children’s feet along with the laughter and seriousness were welcomed by Daddy.

Daddy was a man of immense overstanding and knowledge.  He listened and he engaged me and my siblings and others in countless activities and pursuits.  Early-on, Daddy saw my ‘Blackness’ and he guided and schooled me accordingly.

My father expressed particular beliefs and values that continue to resonate with me to this day.  Example:  A man should never hit a woman.  ‘If a woman holding a baseball bat comes at a man, it is far better for that man to try to run away than for that man to put his hands on the woman.’  Example:  Man is human.  ‘Never put any human being on a pedestal.’  Example:  Do not get ‘caught-up’ in the accolades nor the criticisms.

Being an adventurous and curious young child, I sometimes  asked Daddy when I would be old enough to finally leave home and personally explore the world.  Daddy’s response:  ‘YOU will know when you are ready to REALLY leave home and your father will know as well….’  Life, for me, was serious and I listened with my eyes, ears, and heart.

‘Little Lulu’ appreciated and valued the experiences and stories shared by her elders and others.  I heard the older Blacks as they spoke of racism — slavery, drag racing, and more.  I listened and I felt and I contemplated.

By the time I reached the age of 16, I knew I was truly ‘ready’ to leave home — as did my father.  I took the train and traveled alone from Portland, Oregon to California.  From California, I traveled with others — via car — to Michigan.  Although I considered remaining in Michigan, I chose to return home a few weeks later in order to complete my high school years in Portland.

While still in high school, I received an unexpected and unsolicited job offer from US Attorney General Robert Kennedy.  My moving expenses and more would be covered if I accepted Kennedy’s offer.  Needless to say, I was excited and sorely tempted, however, Daddy convinced me to turn Kennedy down.  Interestingly, years later I received an offer to work for Robert Kennedy’s brother — Senator Edward Kennedy.  I turned down that offer as well….

Don’t forget our reparations!  Do YOU know what time it is?

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Undying love for Black People

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Vanport and Black Genocide in Oregon

Vanport and Black Genocide in Oregon

As an infant, I surmise that life was relatively simple for yours truly.  Growing in conscious awareness, however, I quickly saw the difference between Black folk and White folk.  And, as I survived the racist nature of Whites in Oregon, I gained firsthand insight into the ugliness of racism.

The Black community in Oregon was rich in culture, knowledge, wisdom, survival skills, watchfulness, and love.  Our elders were so very gifted and – in spite of the horrors many were privy to and subjected to – those who survived maintained their humanity.

Life was not easy for Black people in a racist Oregon.  The 1940s had brought a relatively high number of Black men and Black women and their families to the Oregon area.  We had been recruited and encouraged to move to Oregon to work in the Shipyards.  The government had helped in financing the building of a manmade city (think of ‘White’ Edgar F. Kaiser and today’s Kaiser Permanente) for us to live in.  Blacks were given verbal assurances by White officials that we would be safe and secure living in the manmade city named Vanport.

Following the ‘war’ years, however, the Black adults who remained in Vanport knew that we had lost our wartime usefulness to the Whites of Oregon.  Meetings were held and we Blacks were again repeatedly promised by White officials that we would be safe remaining in Vanport.  We were told that Vanport was secure and that we did not need to worry about the city flooding or anything else.

In short time, the White man’s word proved to be worthless and the city of Vanport flooded in 1948.

The Black adults who survived the 1948 Vanport flood often reminisced and – sometimes mulled over — the events and timeliness of the Vanport flood.  They expressed that the flood was an intentional racist attempt to eliminate their Black presence in Oregon.  And, although I was but a child at the time of the Vanport flood, I was always allowed to be present during adult talk and discussions.

In spite of the accepted ‘official’ government counts, the Black men and women who lived in Vanport knew firsthand that the number of Blacks who died in the flood was far greater than recorded in ‘official’ records.

I am a ‘Black’ survivor of Vanport.  My account of events is non-negotiable!  And, by the way, my Black family never received a dime in compensation for our losses nor did we receive any government assistance.  Likewise, we did not receive any help or even an apology from ‘White’ Edgar F. Kaiser who so richly profited as a result of Vanport.

Nuff’ said.

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Don’t Forget Our Reparations!

I am today reminded of ‘Black and Beautiful’ Queen Mother Moore!  I first had the privilege of meeting Queen Mother Moore during the 1960s.  Queen Mother Moore was a strong and determined Black elder – a woman who urged us Blacks in the ‘Movement’ to never forget our reparations.  It seemed that almost always after a Black convention or conference I attended, there would stand Queen Mother Moore waiting in the exitway to give me a big hug, embrace, and encouragement.  Queen Mother Moore ALWAYS exhorted me to not compromise our fight for righteousness.  And, Queen Mother Moore always spoke her famous words to me “Don’t forget our reparations”.

Queen Mother Moore was one of the many Black women who supported, encouraged, and lived the Black ‘Movement’.  She inspired me to always remember and to never forget – no matter the pressures and/or inducements to do otherwise.

As I share these words and memories with you, I reach beyond myself to publicly thank Queen Mother Moore and so many many other Black women who lovingly gave and continue to give of themselves.  They – and yours truly — were some of the Black sisters who fought and continue to fight for righteousness.  I am convinced that my life in the ‘Movement’ was and is deliberate and intended – ‘many are called, few are chosen’….

Be Aware!

A trend has developed and is developing that is unsettling at best.  The trend is to have a Black man with White women introduce and present race-related talks and training sessions.  The audience is almost always White or majority-White.  The Black man and White women team receives compensation for enabling the myth that particular Whites are ‘for real’ in their search for knowledge, growth, and racial healing.  Such presentations and discussions are designed to make Whites comfortable … plain and simple.  And, seldom — if ever — does anything significant change following such trainings and presentations.

The Black man with White women presentations almost always applaud those Whites present for their courage in turning out to engage in the ‘most-difficult’ discussion relative to race and racism in America….  The Black man and White women teams express that their presentations are NOT about blame or guilt.  They warn against loud voices (i.e. genuine emotion that could come from any Blacks present in the audience) and urge ‘civil’ dialogue and conversation.

Give me a break!

Applauding Whites for their courage relative to racism is akin to thanking a White arsonist for burning down ‘only’ seven hundred and three Black-occupied homes as opposed to seven hundred and four!  It is akin to thanking a White man for stabbing a 90-year-old Black woman eighty-seven times and not stabbing the woman eighty-eight times.  It is akin to thanking a White person for setting off a bomb at the Boston Marathon rather than setting off the bomb at the Pentagon near Washington, DC!

Reality is that Whites are both historically and currently guilty of racism.  Reality is that Blacks were and are the victims of White racism.  Reality is that Whites were and are the perpetrators of racism.  Reality is that White folk owe Black folk for 400 years of slavery and more….  Fact is that Whites will forever be faced with their own guilt and inhumane ways until they repent-in-earnest and atone.  Blacks are beyond entitled to reparations.  And, until Whites atone for their sins against Black people, Whites will continue on their journey towards hell.

Any ‘real’ attempt at Black and White racial healing in America must include reparations for America’s Blacks.  Individual Whites have the obligation and calling to ‘give’ as able and when able if they truly seek and desire racial healing, peace, and salvation.  The fact is that Whites will continue to condemn themselves and their progeny to perpetual guilt and condemnation as long as they ignore and dismiss their humongous debt to Black folk.  The curse that White folk function under will remain until they do that which is called for, that which is just, that which is right.  Know that the ‘sins of one generation follows the next and generations to come’.

White folk must begin the process of action with regards to reparations.  White folk can start by establishing a Reparations Body-of-Purpose, a body with the sole (soul) ‘initial’ mission of pressuring, influencing, and persuading the US government and US monopolies to pay reparations to America’s Black populace.  America’s Blacks are due reparations and, as a side note, each of us Blacks has the individual right to do with any and all cash payments as each of us chooses!

Do I expect Whites to eventually move in the direction of doing the right thing – to move in the direction of reparations for Black people?  Yes.  Do I expect to receive any of the reparations due me and mine in my lifetime?  No.

‘Don’t forget our reparations’.

Happy Kwanzaa!

Feel free to share this BlackAngryWomen blog with others.  We are all works in progress.  Do YOU know what time it is?  http://BlackAngryWomen.com/

Undying love for Black people!

http://BlackAngryWomen.com/